MidReal Story

Secrets of the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain

Scenario: Exploring the legend of the agesLocated at the foot of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, the Daughter of the East, the ancient Naxi Kingdom, all the secrets seem to be hidden in the white sand murals and Gemu Peak. But who are the contemporary secret hunters? Lin Xuan, a young historical scholar of Chinese descent from the United States, focuses on the study of the history of human development and pursues "human worthiness." He traveled through time and space to the Wei and Jin Dynasties, and visited the Naxi Kingdom, a fantasy and secret place where Eastern and Western cultures and maternal and paternal civilizations met. The civilized ecology here integrates nature and humanity, just like the majestic, majestic and majestic Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, and the charming, petite and beautiful Lugu Lake and Lanyue Valley, complementing each other and shining brightly; and like the Jade Dragon The snow-capped mountains are surrounded by clouds and mists, changing rapidly, with countless manners, and are extremely magical. The ancient culture of the Mosuo people that remains the same today is both unforgettable and indistinguishable. Lin Xuan came to the scene in person and felt it for the first time: Looking from the side, it looks like a forest and a peak, with different heights and distances. He doesn't know the true face of the Jade Dragon, just because he is in this mountain. I hope that his exploration will be successful, and that he will have a wonderful relationship with the ancient Naxi civilization and the daughter country with various styles... At this time, he has passed the Tea Horse Road and arrived at the daughter country, drinking The water of Lugu Lake, walking on the Walking Wedding Bridge...one wonderful story after another is about to unfold! Key elements: adventure, anecdotes, supernatural, thriller..., causal loop. A total of 30 stories, each of 20,000 words, are written. They are all ancient human legends, as well as some ultra-modern human society and natural phenomena. Although Lin Xuan is a scholar of human history and has acquired a lot of anthropological knowledge from books, it is still shallow. He still wants to explore the history of human development from the source: For example, what is a matrilineal society? Why is matrilineal society the source of human social structure? Why was matriarchal society later replaced by patriarchal society? What are the pros and cons of each of these two social structures? Especially on issues such as love, marriage, and childbirth, as well as on issues such as social efficiency and fairness. Lin Xuan feels: The world is worth it, and experience creates meaning: meaningless tiredness is truly tired, and the result of meaningless efforts is true failure. Lin Xuan's hypothesis: The material-based development of contemporary human society has reached its end or extreme. It seems that society has reached a turning point or a new reincarnation. Might matriarchal society be a new choice for contemporary society?The Mosuo people are the living samples he is currently investigating. Why can their matriarchal society survive to this day? What are their lifestyles and ideas that contemporary people can learn from?
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Exploring the legend of the agesLocated at the foot of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, the Daughter of the East, the ancient Naxi Kingdom, all the secrets seem to be hidden in the white sand murals and Gemu Peak. But who are the contemporary secret hunters? Lin Xuan, a young historical scholar of Chinese descent from the United States, focuses on the study of the history of human development and pursues "human worthiness." He traveled through time and space to the Wei and Jin Dynasties, and visited the Naxi Kingdom, a fantasy and secret place where Eastern and Western cultures and maternal and paternal civilizations met. The civilized ecology here integrates nature and humanity, just like the majestic, majestic and majestic Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, and the charming, petite and beautiful Lugu Lake and Lanyue Valley, complementing each other and shining brightly; and like the Jade Dragon The snow-capped mountains are surrounded by clouds and mists, changing rapidly, with countless manners, and are extremely magical. The ancient culture of the Mosuo people that remains the same today is both unforgettable and indistinguishable. Lin Xuan came to the scene in person and felt it for the first time: Looking from the side, it looks like a forest and a peak, with different heights and distances. He doesn't know the true face of the Jade Dragon, just because he is in this mountain. I hope that his exploration will be successful, and that he will have a wonderful relationship with the ancient Naxi civilization and the daughter country with various styles... At this time, he has passed the Tea Horse Road and arrived at the daughter country, drinking The water of Lugu Lake, walking on the Walking Wedding Bridge...one wonderful story after another is about to unfold! Key elements: adventure, anecdotes, supernatural, thriller..., causal loop. A total of 30 stories, each of 20,000 words, are written. They are all ancient human legends, as well as some ultra-modern human society and natural phenomena. Although Lin Xuan is a scholar of human history and has acquired a lot of anthropological knowledge from books, it is still shallow. He still wants to explore the history of human development from the source: For example, what is a matrilineal society? Why is matrilineal society the source of human social structure? Why was matriarchal society later replaced by patriarchal society? What are the pros and cons of each of these two social structures? Especially on issues such as love, marriage, and childbirth, as well as on issues such as social efficiency and fairness. Lin Xuan feels: The world is worth it, and experience creates meaning: meaningless tiredness is truly tired, and the result of meaningless efforts is true failure. Lin Xuan's hypothesis: The material-based development of contemporary human society has reached its end or extreme. It seems that society has reached a turning point or a new reincarnation. Might matriarchal society be a new choice for contemporary society?The Mosuo people are the living samples he is currently investigating. Why can their matriarchal society survive to this day? What are their lifestyles and ideas that contemporary people can learn from?
On a brisk autumn day in 2014, I stood at the foot of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, preparing for the journey of a lifetime.
As a young scholar with a passion for history and ancient civilizations, I was about to embark on an expedition that would take me to the heart of a kingdom shrouded in mystery and legend: the Naxi Kingdom.
Situated in the far reaches of northwestern Yunnan Province in China, the Naxi Kingdom lies at the foot of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, a breathtaking landscape of towering peaks and serene valleys.
The kingdom is home to the Naxi people, an ethnic group with a rich cultural heritage that dates back more than 2,000 years.
Among their most notable contributions are the white sand murals, which adorn the ancient walls of the Naxi capital and are said to depict the history and legends of the kingdom.
At the center of this enigmatic land stands Gemu Peak, an iconic mountain that is considered sacred by the Naxi people and has long been a source of inspiration for poets and artists.
As I stood before this majestic landscape, I felt a sense of awe and wonder at the natural beauty that surrounded me.
But more than that, I was filled with a deep sense of purpose and determination, for I had come to this remote and untouched land with a singular goal in mind: to unlock the secrets of the ancient Naxi Kingdom and bring its long-forgotten history back to life.
This was no ordinary research project; it was a personal odyssey that had been years in the making.
Ever since I first set foot on American soil as a young student from China, I had been consumed by a curiosity about human social structures and what makes one society more “worthy” than another.
This curiosity had driven me to pursue my studies in history and anthropology, and it had led me to embark on this extraordinary expedition in search of answers.
As I began my journey through the Naxi Kingdom, I knew that I was carrying with me the weight of my academic ambitions and the hope of unraveling the mysteries that had confounded scholars for centuries.
But more than that, I was carrying with me the hope of finding answers to the questions that had consumed me for so long.
For as long as I could remember, I had been driven by a single idea: that each society has its own unique set of characteristics that give it value in the eyes of its members.
I had devoted my academic career to exploring this concept in depth, but I knew that there was still much that I did not understand.
As I immersed myself in the history and culture of the Naxi people, I felt that I was on the verge of a breakthrough—that I was finally about to find the answers I had been searching for all these years.
But as I made my way through the kingdom’s ancient streets and marveled at its remarkable beauty, I realized that my quest for knowledge was not merely an academic exercise—it was a journey of self-discovery that would forever change the way I looked at the world.
For here in the heart of the Naxi Kingdom, I found myself standing at the crossroads of time and space, where the ancient met the contemporary in a harmonious blend of cultures.
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The vision before me was breathtaking; the white sand murals and the ancient walls of the Naxi capital loomed large, seeming to speak directly to my soul.
In that moment, I was struck by a sudden realization that shook me to my core: that the knowledge I had spent years accumulating was nothing more than a series of disconnected facts and theories that were devoid of meaning in the grand scheme of things.
I was forced to confront the fact that “human worthiness,” the concept that had guided my entire academic journey, was little more than a mirage—a fleeting illusion that obscured the simple truth of what it means to be human.
For so long, I had believed that worthiness was something that each society had to earn through its own unique set of characteristics—that it was something that could be measured and quantified through the lens of history and culture.
But in that moment, as I stood amidst the ancient ruins of the Naxi Kingdom, I could no longer ignore the nagging doubts that plagued my mind.
For years, I had devoted myself to the pursuit of knowledge—to the study of ancient civilizations and the social structures that defined them.
I had sought out answers to the big questions that have confounded scholars for centuries—the questions of why some societies succeed while others fail, and what ultimately determines their worthiness in the eyes of their members.
I had spent countless hours poring over dusty old books and manuscripts in search of clues that would lead me closer to the truth.
And yet, despite all my efforts, I still found myself at an impasse—wondering if perhaps the answers I sought were simply beyond my reach.
It was a humbling realization—one that forced me to confront my own intellectual limitations and the very real possibility that my pursuit of knowledge had been misguided from the start.
The pursuit of knowledge is a noble endeavor, to be sure.
But sometimes, I think that we become so focused on the pursuit itself that we lose sight of the simple truths that define our humanity.
And in my case, I had become so consumed by the pursuit of knowledge that I had neglected to pay attention to the questions that really mattered.
But as I stood there on the precipice of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, with its icy waters stretching out before me, I knew that it was time for a change—time for me to break free from the confines of my own preconceptions and embrace the unknown with an open heart and a clear mind.
And so, with a deep breath and a leap of faith, I threw myself into the frigid waters, letting the cold embrace of the lake wash away the doubts and fears that had been weighing me down.
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When I emerged, sputtering and gasping for air, I felt like a new man.
As I made my way back to shore, wringing out my clothes and catching my breath, I couldn't help but smile, feeling the warmth of the sun on my face and the clear blue sky stretching out above me.
It was a beautiful day, and I was filled with a renewed sense of purpose and determination.
I didn't know what lay ahead, but I was ready to face it head-on and see where this journey would take me.
And as I set out to explore the Naxi Kingdom once more, little did I know that I was about to embark on the adventure of a lifetime…
When I stumbled upon the group of tourists at the entrance to Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, I couldn't believe my luck.
They were a motley crew—dressed in brightly colored parkas, clutching their cameras like lifelines—but they looked friendly enough.
And when they mistook me for a local and offered me an obscene amount of money to be their guide, I didn't correct them.
I was a little rusty, I'll admit, but the mountain hadn't changed much since my last visit, and I still remembered all the best trails and lookout points.
I led them up to Glacier Park, where we spent the afternoon admiring the stunning views and snapping photos like there was no tomorrow.
They were thrilled with the experience, and when it was over, they pressed the money into my hands, along with an extremely generous tip.
It was more money than I'd seen in months, and I was so overcome with gratitude that I didn't quite know what to say.
So I just smiled and thanked them, watching as they piled back into their tour bus and drove away.
As I stood there, counting my spoils and reveling in my good fortune, I felt like the universe was sending me a sign.
This was my chance, I realized—my chance to seize the opportunity and make the most of it.
It was time for me to stop standing on the sidelines and start diving headfirst into the mysteries that surrounded me.
And so I set out, more determined than ever to unravel the secrets of the Naxi Kingdom and discover what made it so special.
For years, scholars have been debating the origins of human civilization, arguing over which came first: the maternal or the paternal.
But here, in the heart of the Naxi Kingdom, I believed I would find the answer at last.
I spent weeks exploring the ancient ruins and immersing myself in the local culture, searching for clues that would help me piece together the puzzle.
And what I discovered was nothing short of astounding.
But I'll get to that in a minute…
First, let me tell you about the Mosuo people—a matriarchal society living on Lugu Lake, not far from Jade Dragon Snow Mountain.
The first time I visited Lugu Lake, I was struck by how different it was from anything I'd ever seen before—the crystal-clear waters, the lush greenery, the snow-capped mountains in the distance.
But what really captured my attention were the Mosuo people themselves.
They lived in large extended families, with several generations under one roof, and were organized around matrilineal lines.
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In most matriarchal societies, the women hold a lot of power and influence, but the men still have a role to play.
They're seen as the heads of the family, the primary breadwinners, and the protectors of their wives and children.
But in the Mosuo society, things are a little different.
Here, the women hold all the power and make all the decisions, while the men are essentially useless.
They don't work, they don't provide for their families, and they don't even live at home.
Instead, they're little more than sperm donors, moving from one woman to the next, and sleeping with whomever they please.
It's an unusual arrangement, to be sure, but it seems to work for them, and they have managed to maintain their cultural traditions and customs for centuries.
Today, the Mosuo people are something of a tourist attraction—with visitors from all over the world coming to see their unique way of life firsthand—but to me, they are so much more than that.
To me, they are a living testament to the power of maternal civilizations and the importance of preserving our ancient traditions.
As I stood on the shore of Lugu Lake, looking out at its vast expanse, I felt as though I was gazing into the past.
They say that Lugu Lake is the source of both the Lancang River and the Yangtze River—two of the most important waterways in China—and when I saw it, I could understand why.
Its beauty was otherworldly, almost magical, with the Lanyue Valley and Jade Dragon Snow Mountain looming in the distance, adding an air of grandeur to the already stunning landscape.
I was in awe.
From Lugu Lake, it's only a short trip to Gemu Peak—the highest peak of the Yunnan-Tibet Plateau—standing at a whopping 5,396 meters above sea level.
As I made my way up the mountain, I marveled at its snow-capped summit, which seemed to stretch up into the heavens like a stairway to paradise.
It was a breathtaking sight, and I couldn't help but stop and take it all in.
The Naxi Kingdom is an ancient land, home to one of the oldest civilizations in human history.
But as I stood there, gazing out at the pristine landscape and drinking in the beauty that surrounded me, I was reminded just how young our species really is.
Everywhere I looked, I saw evidence of a world that had existed long before we came along—a world that would continue to exist long after we were gone.
And it made me wonder: what right did we have to claim it as our own?
We like to think that we are the masters of our domain, the rulers of this planet, but the truth is, we are just another part of the natural order.
We are born from the land, and we will return to it one day, but while we are here, we must strive to live in harmony with it.
That is what the Naxi Kingdom has taught me—the true meaning of human worthiness—and it is a lesson that I will carry with me for the rest of my days.
As I made my way back down the mountain, I knew that my journey was far from over.
But whatever lay ahead, I was ready to face it head-on.
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The Mosuo people live in extended families that can include as many as 100 members, all living together in the same household.
These families are known as "Dage," or "Matriarchal Villages," and are headed by an eldest woman, known as the "Dage Mama," who is the oldest living female member of the family.
The Dage Mama is responsible for assigning tasks to all members of the family, and her authority is absolute.
All members are considered equal, regardless of age or sex, and they work together to grow, harvest, and prepare food, as well as take care of the children.
There is no concept of personal property among the Mosuo people, and goods are shared among all members of the family, being passed down through the female line from one generation to the next.
Marriage as it is traditionally understood does not exist among the Mosuo people.
Instead, they practice what is known as "walking marriages," which allow women to choose their partners without judgment from society.
When a Mosuo woman comes of age, she may invite a man to spend the night with her in her private bedroom—which she shares with her mother and sisters—where they can get to know each other better on an intimate level.
The man will return to his mother's house the next morning, where he will help with the work and take care of his own family.
This custom is designed to allow both men and women to choose their partners freely, without outside pressure, and it has contributed to a society in which harmony and cooperation are highly valued.
The Mosuo people have one of the oldest matriarchal societies in the world, and they have preserved their unique customs and way of life for thousands of years.
As such, they provide valuable insight into how human societies can develop and evolve in ways that benefit all members—men and women alike.
In my studies of ancient human social structures, I have often come across references to matriarchal societies, where women are considered equal—or even superior—to men, and where children belong to their mothers' families rather than their fathers'.
I have always been fascinated by these cultures, and when I learned that there was still a living example of one such society in existence, I knew that I had to see it for myself.
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This is how I came to witness a “walking marriage” ceremony—a tradition of the Mosuo people—while traveling in Lugu Lake, located on the border of Ninglang County in Yunnan Province and Yanyuan County in Sichuan Province, about 300 kilometers from Lijiang Ancient Town.
Walking marriages are a major event in the lives of the Mosuo people, and they bring together men and women from different families for a lifetime of mutual support and love, without the need for a formal marriage or wedding ceremony.
To people in the West, this may sound like a kind of free love, but walking marriages are actually an institution of the Mosuo people that has been passed down from generation to generation.
According to the Mosuo, a woman is the master of her own life, which is why they never ask who the father of a child is but rather who the mother is.
In contrast, to the Han Chinese, who have a deep-rooted concept of patrilineal descent and a strong emphasis on monogamy, walking marriages may seem to be a kind of promiscuity, but the Mosuo people do not think so—it is just a way for men and women to choose each other freely without interference from others.
The ceremony I witnessed was held at the woman’s house, where her family and friends gathered to celebrate.
The groom—who hailed from a different family—also came with his parents to pay a visit to the bride’s family as a token of respect, bearing gifts such as pork, beef, rice wine, tea, sugar, and coal (which are all necessities in daily life), as well as clothes, shoes, hats, umbrellas, and other items used by the bride herself.
After the ceremony concluded, the young couple went to the groom’s home to receive blessings from his family before he moved permanently into the bride’s house—a symbol that they would be together for the rest of their lives.
At the groom’s house, his family slaughtered a pig, roasted some meat over a fire, cooked a pot of rice wine, and brought out the best food they could find to share with the couple.
Every family member was overjoyed, as this meant that the young couple would take care of them in the future.
The groom’s parents were especially pleased, because the bride’s family would provide assistance in the event of a disaster or hardship.
As a result, the groom’s mother laughed so hard that her face turned red, and she made a toast to the bride’s mother as she sat by her side.
This was a rare sight, as they usually shared the same room.
In front of everyone present, the couple drank three bowls of wine each, after which they went back to the bride’s house hand in hand.
The groom then lit a red candle in front of her bedroom door, signifying that he had moved in.
Afterward, he went to sleep in his own room.
The next morning, he got up early to help with the work around the house before going home to his mother’s house at noon.
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