MidReal Story

I want design a product about XR glasses

Apr 8
Scenario: I want design a product about XR glasses and I hope corportion with Meta company.
Create my version of this story
I want design a product about XR glasses and I hope corportion with Meta company.
I’m about to pitch Meta the design for my XR glasses.
It’s taken me years to get here.
Years of rejections.
Years of hearing “I like it, but…”
“I like it, but it’s too” this, that, and the other thing.
And for a long time, I listened.
I took those feedback comments to heart and let them guide my design process.
But I never stopped pushing the envelope.
And today, I get to show the world what happens when you don’t settle for mediocrity.
When you don’t just accept that this is how things are done.
When you don’t stop believing in your vision, even when no one else can see it.
I’ve been working toward this day for ten years.
Ten years of envisioning the future of technology and creating something that I believe can take us there.
Something that can make us better, faster, stronger, smarter.
Something that can help us reach our full potential as human beings.
But when I started pitching my XR glasses design, no one wanted a bar of it.
“No one wants to wear glasses” was the most common complaint.
Which was understandable, I guess.
Back then, glasses were still big and bulky and heavy and uncomfortable, but that’s exactly why I kept going back to the drawing board.
That’s why I kept refining my design over and over again until it was so damn perfect that no one could deny how amazing it was.
And today, I’m finally going to take it out of the pages of my notebook and into the real world.
To show everyone who ever doubted me exactly what I’m capable of.
Exactly what they missed out on by not believing in me.
The team at Meta are going to love what I’ve done with their product.
They’re going to see how my design will take them further than they’d ever dreamed possible.
How it will help them achieve their mission of bringing people closer together in new ways.
I know this is the perfect fit for me, because Meta are just as passionate about the future as I am.
Just as excited about the possibilities that technology offers us in terms of creating something truly amazing.
And they understand that what they’re doing now is just the beginning.
That there is so much more potential out there if we’re willing to dream big enough to grasp it.
If we’re willing to redefine everything that we think we know about science and technology and human behavior.
My glasses aren’t just a product—they’re a lifestyle.
They’re an experience.
I’ve poured my heart and soul into creating something that is a true reflection of who I am as a person and as a designer and as someone who believes with every fiber of her being that she can change the world.
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I have always been a dreamer.
For as long as I can remember, I have been driven by my imagination.
By my desire to create something meaningful—something that would make the world a better place.
When I was in high school, I believed that if you worked hard enough and put your heart into something, you could achieve whatever you put your mind to.
That passion would be enough to get you where you needed to go.
But as I got older, I realized that passion alone wasn’t enough.
That there were things that I would need to learn in order to be able to bring my dreams to life.
That I would need to be able to communicate my ideas in a way that made people see what I saw.
That I would need to be able to convince people that what I was creating was worth their time and money.
That I wouldn’t just be able to coast on enthusiasm.
And so I developed a new mindset.
A new way of thinking about what it would take for me to succeed.
I changed my approach from “I like it” to “this is something that resonates with me.”
And from “this is something that resonates with me” to “this is something that resonates with me and has market appeal.”
And from “this is something that has market appeal” to “this is something that has market appeal and is something that people will be willing and able to pay for.”
And from “this is something that people will be willing and able to pay for” to “this is something that people will be willing and able to pay for and that I am capable of creating.”
It was an evolution—an evolution of my skills as a designer and an evolution of the way that I think about design.
An evolution of the way that I approach the process of creating something new—of pushing the boundaries of what we know and believe about the world around us.
An evolution of the way that I look at things—and the way that I value the work that goes into creating something truly extraordinary.
An evolution of my mindset—an evolution of the way that I see myself in relation to what I am creating and what it takes to create it.
It wasn’t easy.
It took time and effort and energy and so many failures along the way, but it was worth it in the long run.
Those rejections fueled my creativity and pushed me to continue refining my design until it was so perfect that no one could deny how amazing it was.
Those rejections made me work harder, until I was happy with every single detail of my design.
Until every single decision was one that I had made because it was the best choice—not just because it was good enough not to be rejected by someone else.
Until the only answer that I could give when asked “what would you change?”
was “nothing.”
Because there wasn’t anything that needed changing—I had made sure of it.
I’m not the best designer in the world—not yet anyway.
I still have so much more growing and learning and improving left to do before I can say that, but I am committed to growing and learning and improving every day until I get there.
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