MidReal Story

Whispers of Destiny

Scenario: a gold apple drop from tree, the woman put it in river
Create my version of this story
a gold apple drop from tree, the woman put it in river
His friends were waiting for him, so he gave me one last smile before waving goodbye and disappearing down the road.
The woman with the golden apple was alone.
“Who was that?”
She had been alone for a long time, and she would be alone for much longer still.
one of his friends asked when he returned.
“I don’t know.” He shrugged, feeling a little foolish for calling out to a stranger like that, but something about her had seemed familiar…
She had no need of the golden apple, so she dropped it in the river.
The river carried it away, and the woman with the golden apple went on her way as well.
Orion Vale was not your run-of-the-mill adventurer.
He didn’t have a tragic backstory or any burning desire for revenge or redemption or whatever else fueled most heroes on their journeys.
The apple was found by a man who was not alone.
He was with his friends, and they were on an adventure.
He wasn’t in search of fame or fortune or glory or power either.
He picked up the golden apple and showed it to his friends, who were all very impressed.
No, Orion Vale’s only goal in life was to learn everything there was to know about plants—how they grew and thrived, how they withered and died—and then share what he learned with his people so they could grow better crops and heal their sick more effectively.
They asked him where he’d gotten it, but he didn’t know.
Which was why Orion Vale was in search of a legendary plant that supposedly grew beyond the border of their small kingdom—a plant that could cure any disease known to man if you ate its fruit, which grew once every hundred years.
Orion Vale knew it sounded too good to be true, but his best friend, the local historian, had uncovered some old scrolls in the library archives that mentioned a golden apple capable of changing the course of someone’s life with a single bite, and now Orion Vale couldn’t get the idea out of his head.
He’d just found it under a tree.
“It must be the plant,” he said to himself as he trudged down the road after Lyra, the warrior leading their group.
His friends told him to keep it, but he didn’t want to.
It wasn’t his to keep, and he didn’t know what to do with it anyway.
She’d grown bored with walking in a straight line earlier and had started wandering all over the place in search of danger, which hadn’t been hard to find—there were monsters everywhere outside the city—but the rest of them were having trouble keeping up with her, so she’d finally agreed to let the mapmaker take the lead again.
The mapmaker was an old man who’d been drawing maps of their kingdom for decades, but he’d always wanted to explore the world beyond their borders, so he’d convinced a group of locals to come with him on one last adventure before he retired for good.
So he threw it in the river.
The rest of the group consisted of Orion Vale, who’d been chosen for his knowledge of local flora; Lyra, who’d been chosen for her expertise in combat; and another healer, who’d been chosen for her ability to keep them alive if they got sick or injured along the way.
The river carried it away, and the man went on his way as well.
All of them were good people who’d grown up in the same village together, so they knew each other well enough to know when to tease and when to be serious—except for Lyra, who never knew when to be serious and often kicked Orion in the rear when he least expected it just to see the look on his face when he fell on it.
The apple was found by a woman who was not alone either.
The woman with the golden apple was still alone.
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She had been alone for a long time, and she would be alone for much longer still.
Why do you care so much anyway?”
She had no need of the golden apple, so she dropped it in the river.
Orion’s friends were all gathered around him now, gazing at him with wide eyes as they waited for him to tell them what had happened earlier by the riverbank.Even though they hadn’t known what that apple was or where it had come from, they’d all agreed that Orion should have kept it just because it looked so expensive, and now they were giving him a hard time about it after finding out that he’d thrown it back into the river just like Elara had.
The river carried it away, and the woman with the golden apple went on her way as well.
“I already told you,” Orion said with a shrug as he glanced down at his friend’s hand, which was still clutching something small and round that looked like a golden acorn.“I didn’t know what that thing was or where it came from, and I didn’t want to be responsible for it if something bad happened to it when I took it home with me.”
The apple was found by a man who was not alone.
He was with his friends, and they were on an adventure.
“Yeah, but what if it was meant for you?”
He picked up the golden apple and showed it to his friends, who were all very impressed.
his friend asked, his eyes wide with excitement.
“What if it’s a magic apple, and it would have given you the power to heal the sick, raise the dead, or grow wings like a bird?”
They asked him where he’d gotten it, but he didn’t know.
Orion laughed at that as he shook his head.
He’d just found it under a tree.
“I think you’ve been reading too many old stories about the king.” He glanced over at the other healer, who was blushing at the mention of their leader’s more famous exploits.“But seriously, I don’t even like apples, so I’m sure it wasn’t meant for me.” He shrugged as he glanced around at the rest of his friends, who were all watching him with amused expressions.
His friends told him to keep it, but he didn’t want to.
It wasn’t his to keep, and he didn’t know what to do with it anyway.
“Besides, we could always go find it again if we wanted to.” The rest of them all agreed with him about that, but not about the apple.
“Yeah, but what if it was meant for Lyra?”
So he threw it in the river.
someone asked in a hushed voice, which made Lyra grin even wider than she already had at the mention of her name.
The river carried it away, and the man went on his way as well.
“If I had taken that apple home with me,” she said in a loud voice as she gazed around at the rest of them, “I would have been able to kick everyone’s rear without getting tired again.” She grinned at Orion as she added in a softer voice, “And then you wouldn’t have had to worry about keeping me safe.”
The woman with the golden apple was still alone.
She had been alone for a long time, and she would be alone for much longer still.
The rest of them all laughed at that before they turned around and headed back down the road in search of their missing companion, who was still leading the way up front.
The town behind them was long gone now, so they were all hiking through the mountains in search of new herbs for Orion and new monsters for Lyra while they waited for the mapmaker to finish drawing his latest map.
She had no need of the golden apple, so she dropped it in the river.
The river carried it away, and the woman with the golden apple went on her way as well.
I found the apple under a tree on the way back to my cottage one day.
It was an ordinary tree growing by the side of an ordinary road, but in that moment, I felt like something extraordinary had happened.
I picked up the apple and turned it over in my hands.
It was so beautiful that I couldn’t bear the thought of eating it or throwing it away in a few days when it rotted, so I decided to give it to someone else instead.
I made my way to the river that ran by my cottage and tossed the apple in.
As it floated away, I caught sight of a man standing on the opposite bank, watching me with dark eyes.
He was of medium height, with short brown hair that looked like he’d just cut it himself and kind eyes that seemed full of curiosity.
I’d never seen him before, but something about him seemed familiar.
He raised his hand in greeting.
“Hello,” he said.
“Hi,” I called back.
He smiled at me from across the water and then turned back to whatever he’d been doing before he saw me.
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