MidReal Story

Love's Academic Detour

Scenario: Introduce Venus, a shy and reserved college student who focuses on her studies and ignores the advances of men. She is seen as a prude by her classmates, but is determined to succeed academically.
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Introduce Venus, a shy and reserved college student who focuses on her studies and ignores the advances of men. She is seen as a prude by her classmates, but is determined to succeed academically.
I was late for class.
I’d been stuck in traffic for the past thirty minutes, and I was still a good ten minutes away from the university.
I’d never been late for this class before, and I didn’t want to start now.
My professor was strict, and he didn’t take kindly to students who weren’t prepared.
I’d heard stories of him kicking students out of his class for being late or not having their homework done.
I didn’t want to be one of those students.
I’d worked too hard to get into this class, and I wasn’t going to let a little thing like being late ruin it for me.
I’d just have to hope that he would understand that it wasn’t my fault that I was late today.
There had been an accident on the freeway, and traffic had been backed up for miles.
There was nothing I could do about it, but I knew that wouldn’t matter to him.
He didn’t care about excuses; he only cared about results.
And if you couldn’t deliver the results, then you were out of luck.
I’d always been a meticulous person, and my time in college had only served to make me more so.
I was the type of person who had my entire day planned out before I even got out of bed in the morning.
I knew exactly what clothes I was going to wear, what I was going to eat for breakfast, and how long it would take me to get to school.
I’d made it all the way to my senior year without ever being late to a class, and I wasn’t about to let that streak end now.
I hurried across campus with my backpack slung over my shoulder and my notebook clutched tightly in my hand.
My professor was a stickler for being prepared, and I didn’t want to disappoint him.
He was one of the most respected professors in the university, and his classes were always in high demand.
He also had a reputation for being a bit of a hard-ass when it came to his students.
He expected nothing but the best from us, and he didn’t care how we got there as long as we did.
He’d been known to kick students out of his class if they showed up late or if they weren’t prepared.
He didn’t care if they had good excuses or not; he just wanted results.
I’d heard stories of students who’d been kicked out of his class because they hadn’t done the homework or because they hadn’t been paying attention.
I didn’t want to be one of those students, so I made sure that I was always on time and always well-prepared.
But today was different.
I’d been stuck in traffic for the past half an hour, and there was no way I was going to make it to class on time.
But I wasn’t going to give up without a fight.
I would make it to class even if it killed me, and I would do everything in my power to make sure that he didn’t kick me out.
The university loomed ahead of me as I rushed across campus, my heart pounding in my chest and my breath coming in short gasps.
There were still a few minutes left before class started, but not many, and I was starting to run out of time.
I’d been hoping that there wouldn’t be any traffic on my way here, but I hadn’t been that lucky.
The freeway had been backed up for miles, and it had taken me almost an hour to get here when it should have only taken thirty minutes at most.
I’d lost a lot of precious time, and now I was dangerously close to being late for class.
But I refused to let that happen.
I’d worked too hard to get into this class, and I wasn’t going to let something stupid like traffic ruin it for me.
After what seemed like an eternity of driving around searching for an empty spot, I finally spotted one at the far end of the lot, sandwiched between a couple of enormous SUVs.
I quickly pulled into the spot, narrowly missing a light pole as I did so, and put my car into park.
Clutching my notebook to my chest, I flung open the door and stepped out of the car, almost running to the trunk to grab my backpack before slamming it shut behind me.
Once everything was secure, I locked the doors and hurried across the parking lot, hoping that I wouldn’t be too late.
It wasn’t a very big lot, but it was always packed with cars, a testament to just how difficult it could be to find a place to park on this campus, especially during peak hours like this one.
There were hundreds of students milling around, all of them rushing to get to their classes on time, and more than a few of them gave me strange looks as they passed by.
But I didn’t care what they thought of me; all that mattered was making it to class on time.
By the time I reached the building where my class was held, I was out of breath and almost out of time.
I’d been rushing to get here as fast as I could, but it hadn’t been easy with so many people milling about, getting in my way, and slowing me down.
The building loomed ahead of me, its glass doors reflecting the bright sun as it hung low in the sky, reminding me once again how late I was for class.
There were only a few minutes left before it started, and I knew that if I didn’t hurry, there was a good chance that he would start without me.
The thought of missing even a minute of his lecture filled me with dread; I’d spent so many hours preparing for this day, studying and memorizing everything he’d ever written or said, and the idea that all of that could have been for nothing made me sick to my stomach as I quickened my pace even further.
I reached the doors just as they were closing and hurried inside, my heart pounding in my chest and my breaths coming in short gasps as I tried to catch my breath after running all the way here.
It had taken me a while to find a parking spot, and even longer to get here from where my car was parked, but now that I was finally inside, there was nothing standing between me and my goal of making it to class on time.
The building was empty at this hour, but there were a few people lingering outside the classroom door and making small talk as they waited for their professor to arrive.
My heart skipped a beat when I saw them, and my pace quickened even further as a fresh wave of panic washed over me at the thought of being late to this class.
As I approached the classroom door, my heart beat even faster and harder than before, pounding against my chest like a drum as my mind raced to keep up with all the things that were happening around me at once.
This was it—the moment of truth—and I knew that if I didn’t get inside this room right now and take my seat at the front of the class like usual, there was a good chance that he would start without me and leave me behind again, just like he had last semester.
The thought of being left behind made my stomach turn all over again, and as I reached out to grab the handle and pull open the door, my hands shook with a mixture of anxiety and determination so strong that it was all I could do to keep moving forward even when every fiber of my being wanted to stop and turn back while there was still time.
Time was running out—I knew that much already—and if I didn’t get inside soon he would start without me for sure.
My face burned hot with embarrassment as I remembered how late I’d been on that first day of class last semester, and how everyone sitting outside in the hallway had watched me hurry past them, all red-faced and out of breath, before I’d finally managed to catch my professor’s eye.
He’d been the only one who’d been able to save me that day, and if it hadn’t been for him, I probably would have been kicked out of this course altogether.
He was the one who’d seen me standing there, all flushed and out of breath, and the one who’d decided at the last minute to let me inside the room even though I’d been almost ten minutes late.
I’d been the only one who’d made it into the classroom that day, and I’d been the only one who’d been able to take his class at all—the rest of them had all been shut out for good, and forced to find some other course to take instead.
He’d started without me that day, but I’d been able to catch up soon enough—and it hadn’t taken me long to realize that I was the only one who’d done so, either.
The rest of them hadn’t returned at all, and the ones who had come had never taken the course seriously, either.
They’d all chuckled when they saw me walk into class that day, but by the end of the semester, they’d all been quiet.
I was sure they would be this time, too, but until then, I was going to have to keep moving forward like nothing was wrong.
I was going to have to keep pushing forward until I made my way inside this classroom and took my seat up front where I belonged, where everyone else belonged—and where he’d be waiting for me when he finally arrived.
No one else would be allowed up there with us; we’d be alone the entire time, just like always.
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