MidReal Story

Legacy of the Gypsy King

Scenario: the story of a gypsy his son and his grandson how the gypsy escaped from Auschwitz and then became the king of gypsy in Latin America. after dying from a heart attack his son took the place of the gypsy king and he was killed in an accident
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the story of a gypsy his son and his grandson how the gypsy escaped from Auschwitz and then became the king of gypsy in Latin America. after dying from a heart attack his son took the place of the gypsy king and he was killed in an accident
Auschwitz, 1944
I was in the middle of a game of chess when the sirens went off.
The other prisoners and I looked at each other, confused.
The sirens hadn’t gone off in months.
We knew what they meant.
We had to get to the bunkers.
But we also knew that if we went to the bunkers, we’d be killed.
They were going to kill us all anyway, so what was the point?
I decided to stay where I was and finish my game of chess.
The other prisoners followed my lead and went about their business as if nothing was happening.
The sirens stopped, and a few minutes later, we heard gunshots and screaming coming from outside.
I looked out the window and saw that the guards were shooting at anything that moved.
Prisoners who had tried to make a run for it were being gunned down in cold blood.
I watched as one of them fell to the ground, his body convulsing as he bled out on the snow-covered ground.
I moved my bishop and looked up at my opponent.
He was a thin man, with sunken cheeks and a hollow expression.
His eyes were rimmed with red, as if he hadn’t slept in days.
I liked him.
He was smart and he didn’t take any shit from anyone.
We’d been playing chess together for the past few weeks, and we were evenly matched.
He moved his knight, and I frowned as I scanned the board for my next move.
The sirens went off again, their wailing cutting through the air like a knife.
I sighed and looked at my opponent.
He shrugged and picked up his queen, moving it to take one of my pawns.
I shook my head and moved my rook, putting his king in check.
He swore under his breath and moved his king out of harm’s way.
We both looked up as the other prisoners began to file out of the room.
They knew what was happening, even if they didn’t know why.
The sirens meant we were under attack.
The Nazis were coming for us.
The order had been given to take cover in the bunkers, but we all knew what that meant.
Going to the bunkers was just another way of saying we were going to die.
The Nazis would round us up and shoot us, or they would burn us alive in our hiding places.
We’d seen it happen many times before, to other prisoners in other camps.
They’d learned to take their chances out in the open, rather than hiding like cowards and waiting for death to find them.
The other prisoners glanced at me with uncertainty in their eyes.
I was the gypsy king, the leader of our clan, and they all looked to me for guidance.
I met their gazes evenly, my expression stoic and unreadable.
I didn’t know what to do any more than they did.
I turned back to the board and moved my rook, putting his king in check again.
My opponent frowned and swore under his breath.
“Your move,” I said, my voice quiet but firm.
He glanced at the door, then back at me before picking up one of his pieces and moving it across the board, putting my king in check as well.
I moved my king out of harm’s way and put his king in checkmate with my queen on the next move.
He swore again and shook his head as he extended his hand across the board.
“You’re getting better,” he said grudgingly as I took it and gave it a firm shake.
“You’re just not good enough,” I replied with a small smile.
He chuckled and stood up, glancing down at the board as he gathered up our pieces.
“Maybe next time,” he said as he followed the other prisoners out of the room.
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We could leave the camp?
I looked at the door, my heart racing with excitement at the prospect of freedom, no matter how slim.
My eyes flicked to the window, then to the board, where our game was still set up, the pieces frozen in time.
The sirens stopped, and I heard the guards shouting outside.
“Everyone to the bunkers!”
“Get moving, you fucking rats!”
Defiance would not be tolerated.
The other prisoners hesitated, then began to move again, shuffling towards the door in a single file line, their eyes downcast and their shoulders hunched.
A pair of guards entered the room and herded them out of the building, their guns trained on the hapless souls who dared to lag behind.
I watched them go, my heart heavy with despair.
There was no escape.
Not from this place.
Not from these monsters.
Not from the inevitability of death.
I sighed and stood up, taking one last look at the chessboard before I followed the others outside.
There was something I needed to do before I left.
My opponent was still in the room when I returned, sitting at the table with his head in his hands.
He looked up as I entered, his eyes red-rimmed with exhaustion.
I took a deep breath and met his gaze, my expression grim.
“It’s time,” I said.
He sighed and stood up, nodding his understanding.
“Let me get my things.”
He walked past me, his shoulders slumped with resignation.
I watched him go, then turned back to the board, my eyes scanning our pieces for one last time.
I picked up my knight, moving it across the board to put his king in check.
He looked at me over his shoulder and raised an eyebrow.
I held his gaze evenly as I moved my queen to put his king in checkmate.
He nodded in understanding before turning away to gather his things.
I glanced out the window, my heart heavy with regret as I left the board behind.
I would miss my friend.
I would miss our games of chess.
But life had a way of moving forward, no matter how much we wished it wouldn’t.
I turned away from the window and left the room for the last time.
The other prisoner was waiting for me outside, his bag slung over his shoulder as he stood with his hands clasped behind his back.
He looked at me for a long moment, then nodded in understanding as he began to walk towards the door.
I followed him, my heart racing with anticipation and fear as we made our way through the camp.
We didn’t see any other prisoners on our way to the barracks, but we could hear their voices in the distance, shouting and screaming as they were herded towards the bunkers by the guards.
We reached our destination without incident, and I opened the door to let us inside.
The room was empty, save for a single table with a chessboard set up in the center of it.
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He looked at me for a long moment before sitting down and picking up one of the pieces.
I took my seat across from him and began to set up my pieces on my side of the board.
The other man watched me silently for a moment before speaking.
“Do you hear that?”
I paused in the middle of setting up my pieces and listened.
The sounds of gunshots and screams filled the air outside.
I frowned and shook my head as I moved my rook into position.
The sounds of gunfire were nothing new in Auschwitz.
The Nazis often shot prisoners for no reason at all.
It was just another part of life in the camp.
The other man sighed and moved his bishop in response to my move.
“I know this is difficult for you,” he said as he took one of my pieces.
I nodded as I took my turn, moving my knight to put his king in check.
“It is difficult for all of us.”
He raised an eyebrow as he moved his king out of danger.
“Yes, but you have other reasons to be upset.”
I narrowed my eyes at him as I moved my queen into position to put his king in checkmate.
He looked at me for a long moment before nodding in understanding as he moved one of his pawns to block my attack.
“Check,” I said as I moved one of my pieces to put his king in check again.
He glanced at the window as he moved one of his pieces to block my attack.
“Be careful,” he said as he glanced at me.
“You don’t want to end up like that man who tried to escape earlier.”
I met his gaze evenly as I moved another piece into position to put his king in checkmate.
He frowned as he studied the board for a long moment before moving one of his pieces to block my attack once again.
I heard him sigh as I moved my queen to put his king in checkmate.
I glanced at him as I picked up my cup and took a drink.
The vodka burned my throat, but I didn’t care.
It was going to take more than a few drinks to get rid of the images that were seared into my memory.
I set my cup down with a shaky hand and glanced at him as I picked up my piece.
“Your move,” I said as I moved my piece into position on the board.
He studied the board for a long moment before nodding and picking up one of his own pieces.
I watched him silently as he moved it into position, then looked back at the board to plan my next move.
The sounds of gunfire were still echoing in the distance, but they were getting fainter.
I wondered how many prisoners had been killed already and how many more would die by the time this was all over.
I clenched my jaw as I thought about it, a deep sense of anger welling up inside me.
I had lost count of how many times I had seen this happen, but it never got any easier to watch.
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